In 1929, a double chess game was recorded between Capablanca and Maroczy. The variant chess was played on a 12×16 board and each player had double the pieces of a normal chess game. The invention was by Julian S. Grant Hayward in 1916.

The rules to this game were that the pawns could make an initial of up to four steps and one can only castle a King on his own half of the board. Just as in the standard game, the pawn is promoted when it advances to the other end.

J. R. Capablanca, who would have experimented on various chess variants, found this game very interesting and to borrow from the words of Emanuel Laskey, “when you see a good move, look for a better one”. This could be one of the reasons why Synergy Chess was invented, only this time on a 12×12 board and its rules are arguably more interesting than Hayward’s game. Unlike this game, in which double means the army one is in control of, the Synergy Chess game has a double life line– where you can lose your King and still win the game. It is common knowledge that when you make an advanced attack, it could lead to a loss of a King; however, in the process you will have weakened the opponent or more so, you can sacrifice a King so as to expose your opponents King only to regain your King with an advanced pawn. This is just a glimpse of how interesting the game is by comparison to the standard form.

Other Variations of Chess

Throughout time, alternative chess games have been invented, some closely related and others subversively different in their composition and how they are played. Many of them did not gain popularity, but others have quite a following. Some of these games are:

older versions of Chess, Bughouse Variants, Chess960, Loser’s Chess, Kriegspiel, Atomic Chess and chess with additional pieces where the Synergy Chess falls.

There are several games that have adapted most of the regular game features and added some pieces to the board or increased the board size all together. For example, the Capablanca Chess and Gothic Chess have added two more pieces to them, known as the Chancellor and the Archbishop. The games are played on a wider board of 10×8 that can accommodate the additional pieces; the difference with the games is in how they are arranged. Both the Chancellor and the Archbishop have unique powers, and they also have combined powers. The Chancellor, which is almost as strong as the Queen, can move like a Rook or a Knight while the Archbishop is the only piece that is able to checkmate without any help from other pieces; it can move like a Bishop or a Knight. Interesting, isn’t it?

It is common knowledge that when you make an advanced attack, it could lead to a loss of a King; however, in the process you will have weakened the opponent or more so, you can sacrifice a King so as to expose your opponents King only to regain your King with an advanced pawn. This is just a glimpse of how interesting the game is by comparison to the standard form.

Synergy Chess is easier to learn and play than any other variation of chess to have emerged such as Capablanca and Gothic Chess.